In 2017, The Problem Was The (Real and the Fake) President

Paul Comauex, Opinion Editor

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President Trump with former-National Security Advisor Michael Flynn.

 

2017 has been hectic. Soon, this year will be history. Just not soon enough. And most of the year’s stress has been centered around the presidency, real or fake.

There have been tragedies… such as Donald Trump’s presidency. Hollywood’s perverts seemingly were ousted, including a fake TV president. Most Americans realized racism is alive and well, except for our real life president – a man who used to be a reality TV star. Our political leaders keep arguing about things rather than making actual progress. And our hope for the future is that maybe two real life movie stars weren’t joking when they announced a 2020 bid for the presidency.

We started the year with “alternative facts” coming from real life/former reality star president’s advisor to support a press secretary’s lie about the number of people at President Trump’s Inauguration Address. It’s hard to trust a guy who lied about how big his crowd was as he’s becoming president. Already, there were reports that Russia was involved in Donald Trump’s presidential win, but that’s a different story that will continue into 2018. As of Dec. 14, The New York Times documented that President Trump lied in public a total of 90 of the year’s 348 days, roughly a one-fourth of 2017.

Photo courtesy of NBC.

 

Speaking of presidents, The Rock said he’s likely going to run. Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, a former professional wrestlers and movie star, hosted the comedy show, Saturday Night Live, and “announced” that he would run for president in 2020. Most people didn’t take him seriously. Then again, how many people took Donald Trump seriously in 2015.

Kanye West said that he is potentially running for president. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was seriously considering a presidential run, according to news reports, until people began to lose trust in him. Why? Because, allegedly, Zuckerberg allowed Russian government operatives to run propaganda on his Web site.

When the Trump’s National Security Advisor retired Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn was caught lying to the Trump Administration about his connections to Russia, it forced Trump to, ironically, “drain the swamp” he’d already helped to create. In December, Michigan Congressman John Conyers (D) resigned following credible sexual harassment claims but according to the nytimes.com Conyers said he thought that was “just part of life as a law maker.”

Hollywood was flooded with sexual harassment claims in 2017 and, evidently, many of them have been true. Movie executives like Harvey Weinstein, directors such as Brett Ratner, writers including Andrew Kreisberg and “A-list” actors like Kevin Spacey, the now former star who played a fictitious president, James Underwood, on Netflix’s House of Cards have all been seemingly ousted from their work. These may have caused many women to come out about any unwarranted sexual interactions they had endured as this year’s #MeToo Movement gained steam. It resulted in Spacey losing his TV presidency and being cut out of a film weeks before the movie’s release.

This didn’t only affect Hollywood, it impacted America. Yet, despite having at least 15 women, according to CNN.com, claim that he sexually assaulted them, President Trump doesn’t seem to have been impacted by this movement. In a November 14 article in The New Republic titled “Trump is President But Kevin Spacey Can’t Even Play One On TV,” this question was raised, “Do we have higher standards for TV politicians than for real ones?” 

Sadly in 2017, our real life president shrugged off the blatant racism that reared its ugly head again in America, and in particular, Charlottesville, Virginia where it turned deadly. White supremacists caused a riot in that Virginia city and a man, who was a white supremacist, hit and killed a woman by running over her with his car. President Trump said white supremacists and those who protested against them, were both to blame for the riot.

Though our president pointedly did not call out the white supremacists, President Trump targeted critical tweets toward NFL players who kneeled as the national anthem played at the start of football games throughout the year. No matter what your belief is on the NFL flag issue is, it is getting harder to denying that our president may have a bias against athletes, particularly African American athletes. After all, at one point this year, Trump went after the Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry for being rich.

Multiple tragic incidents took place this year revolving around gun violence. One of the incidents being the biggest mass shooting in recent history at a Las Vegas country music concert. Yet, instead of making steps towards gun reform our politicians, including our president, decided not to take any action of any kind.

Now, with the death of net neutrality, an issue raised in a previous article, it may be harder to find fair and balanced information online or to post criticism of leaders like President Trump. The goal of taking away neutrality, seems to be to keep poor people poor and keep rich people rich.

In that respect, when it comes to the Internet as it did with the entire year, 2017 may not have been different than any other year under the leadership of a billionaire president.

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